Помогите грамотно перевести текст!Срочно надо....Заранее спасибо) Joan Edison came to their half of the fifth grade from Maryland in March. She had a thin face with something of a grown-up’s tired expression and long black eyelashes like a doll’s. Everybody hated her. That month Miss Fritz was reading to them during homeroom about a girl, Emmy, who was badly spoiled and always telling her parents lies about her twin sister, Annie; nobody could believe, it was too amazing, how exactly when they were despising Emmy most, Joan should come into the school with her show-off clothes and her hair left hanging down the back of her fuzzy sweater instead of being cut or braided and her having the crust to actually argue with teachers. “Well I'm sorry,” she told Miss Fritz, not even rising from her seat, “but I don't see what the point is of homework. In Baltimore we never had any, and the little kids there knew what’s in these books.” Charlie, who in a way enjoyed homework, was ready to join in the angry moan of the others. Little hurt lines had leapt up between Miss Fritz`s eyebrows and he felt sorry for her, remembering how when that September John Eberly had half on-purpose spilled purple Sho-Card paint on the newly sandpapered floor, she had hidden her face in her arms on the desk and cried. She was afraid of the school board. “You're not in Baltimore now, Joan,” Miss Fritz said. “You are in Olinger, Pennsylvania.” The children, Charlie among them, laughed, and Joan, blushing a soft brown color and raising her voice excitedly against the current of hatred, got in deeper by trying to explain. “Like there, instead of just reading about plants in a book, we’d one day all bring in a flower we'd picked and cut it open and look at in a microscope.” Because of her saying this, shadows, of broad leaves and wild slashed foreign flowers, darkened and complicated the idea they had of her. Miss Fritz puckered her orange lips into fine wrinkles, then smiled. “In the upper levels you will be allowed to do that in this school. All things come in time, Joan, to patient little girls.” When Joan started to argue this, Miss Fritz lifted one finger and said with the extra weight adults always have, held back in reserve, “No. No more, young lady, or you’ll be in serious trouble with me.” It gave the class courage to see that Miss Fritz didn’t like her either.

lf of the fifth grade from Maryland in March. She had a thin face with something of a grown-up’s tired expression and long black eyelashes like a doll’s. Everybody hated her. That month Miss Fritz was reading to them during homeroom about a girl, Emmy, who was badly spoiled and always telling her parents lies about her twin sister, Annie; nobody could believe, it was too amazing, how exactly when they were despising Emmy most, Joan should come into the school with her show-off clothes and her hair left hanging down the back of her fuzzy sweater instead of being cut or braided and her having the crust to actually argue with teachers. “Well I'm sorry,” she told Miss Fritz, not even rising from her seat, “but I don't see what the point is of homework. In Baltimore we never had any, and the little kids there knew what’s in these books.” Charlie, who in a way enjoyed homework, was ready to join in the angry moan of the others. Little hurt lines had leapt up between Miss Fritz`s eyebrows and he felt sorry for her, remembering how when that September John Eberly had half on-purpose spilled purple Sho-Card paint on the newly sandpapered floor, she had hidden her face in her arms on the desk and cried. She was afraid of the school board. “You're not in Baltimore now, Joan,” Miss Fritz said. “You are in Olinger, Pennsylvania.” The children, Charlie among them, laughed, and Joan, blushing a soft brown color and raising her voice excitedly against the current of hatred, got in deeper by trying to explain. “Like there, instead of just reading about plants in a book, we’d one day all bring in a flower we'd picked and cut it open and look at in a microscope.” Because of her saying this, shadows, of broad leaves and wild slashed foreign flowers, darkened and complicated the idea they had of her. Miss Fritz puckered her orange lips into fine wrinkles, then smiled. “In the upper levels you will be allowed to do that in this school. All things come in time, Joan, to patient little girls.” When Joan started to argue this, Miss Fritz lifted one finger and said with the extra weight adults always have, held back in reserve, “No. No more, young lady, or you’ll be in serious trouble with me.” It gave the class courage to see that Miss Fritz didn’t like her either.

  • 07-08-2007 08:52
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Stasya Kotenko
+1
07-08-2007 17:36

Джоан Эдисон пришел на свою половину пятого класса из Мэриленда в марте. У нее было худое лицо с чем-то взрослый усталому выражению лица и длинные черные ресницы, как у куклы. Все ненавидели ее. В том месяце Мисс Фриц читал их во время классного часа про девушку, Эмми, который был сильно избалован и всегда говорю родителям о лежит ее сестра-близнец, Энни. никто не мог поверить, это было слишком удивительным, как точно, когда они были презирая Эмми всего, Джоан должен прийти в школу с ее понты одежду и ее волосы повисли вниз по задней части ее пушистый свитер вместо того, чтобы вырезать или плетеный и ее коры в самом деле спорить с учителями. “Ну, я сожалею,” сказала она Мисс Фриц, даже не поднимаясь со своего места“, но я не понимаю, в чем смысл домашнего задания. В Балтиморе у нас никогда не было, и маленькие дети там знали, что в этих книгах”. Чарли, который таким образом пользуется домашнее задание, был готов присоединиться к злой стон остальных. Немного больно линии вскочил между Мисс Фриц брови, и он почувствовал жалость к ней, вспоминая, как когда в сентябре того же года Джон Eberly половина на цели пролил пурпур шо-карта краски на Ново sandpapered пол, она спрятала лицо в руках на стол и заплакал. Она боялась совета школы. “Ты сейчас не в Балтиморе, Джоан,” Мисс Фриц сказал. “Вы находитесь в olinger, штат Пенсильвания”. Дети, Чарли среди них, смеялся, и Джоан, краснея мягкий коричневый цвет и взволнованно поднимая свой голос против нынешней ненависти, есть в глубже, пытаясь объяснить. “Как там, вместо того, чтобы просто читать о растениях в книге, мы бы в один день все привести в цветке мы собирали и вскрыть ее и посмотреть в микроскоп.” Потому что, как она сказала это, тени широких листьев и диких рубанул иностранных цветов, потемнел и сложная мысль у них была о ней. Мисс Фриц сморщился ее оранжевые губы в мелких морщинках, а затем улыбнулся. “На верхних уровнях вам будет позволено сделать это в этой школе. Все приходит вовремя, Джоан, маленьким девочкам пациента”. Когда Джоан начали спорить об этом, Мисс Фриц поднял один палец и сказал с дополнительных взрослых вес всегда, в резерве, “нет. Нет, юная леди, или вы будете в серьезные неприятности со мной.” Это придало смелости классе, чтобы увидеть, что мисс Фритц не любил ее.